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Good things come in threes: Communicative acts comprise linguistic, imagistic, and modifying components

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 April 2017

Lena Kästner
Affiliation:
Berlin School of Mind and Brain, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, 10099 Berlin, Germany. mail@lenakaestner.dewww.lenakaestner.de/
Albert Newen
Affiliation:
Institut für Philosophie II, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, 44780 Bochum, Germany. albert.newen@rub.dewww.ruhr-uni-bochum.de/philosophy/staff/newen/

Abstract

Gesture and sign form an integrated communication system, as do gesture and speech. Communicative acts in both systems combine categorical linguistic (words or signs) with imagistic (gestures) components. Additionally, both sign and speech can employ modifying components that convey iconic information tied to a linguistic base morpheme. An accurate analysis of communicative acts must take this third category into account.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2017 

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References

Duncan, S. (2005) Gesture in signing: A case study from Taiwan sign language. Language and Linguistics 6(2):279318.Google Scholar
Okrent, A. (2002) A modality-free notion of gesture and how it can help us with the morpheme vs. gesture question in sign language linguistics, or at least give us some criteria to work with. In: Modality and structure in signed and spoken languages, ed. Meier, R. P., Quinto-Pozos, D. G. & Cormier, K. A., pp. 175–98. Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sandler, W. (2009) Symbiotic symbolization by hand and mouth in sign language. Semiotica 174:241–75.Google Scholar

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