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How to make replications mainstream

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 July 2018

Hans IJzerman
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology (LIP/PC2S), Université Grenoble Alpes, BP 47-38040, Grenoble Cedex 9, France. h.ijzerman@gmail.comwww.hansijzerman.org
Jon Grahe
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Pacific Lutheran University, Tacoma, WA 98447. graheje@plu.edu
Mark J. Brandt
Affiliation:
Department of Social Psychology, Tilburg University, Tilburg 5000 LE, The Netherlands. m.j.brandt@tilburguniversity.eduwww.tbslaboratory.com

Abstract

Zwaan et al. integrated previous articles to promote making replications mainstream. We wholeheartedly agree. We extend their discussion by highlighting several existing initiatives – the Replication Recipe and the Collaborative Education and Research Project (CREP) - which aim to make replications mainstream. We hope this exchange further stimulates making replications mainstream.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2018 

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References

Brandt, M. J., IJzerman, H., Dijksterhuis, A., Farach, F., Geller, J., Giner-Sorolla, R., Grange, J. A., Perugini, M., Spies, J. & van ‘t Veer, A. (2014) The replication recipe: What makes for a convincing replication? Journal of Experimental Social Psychology 50:217–24.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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Grahe, J. E., Brandt, M. J., IJzerman, H., Cohoon, J., Peng, C., Detweiler-Bedell, B. & Weisberg, Y. (2015) Collaborative Replications and Education Project (CREP). Available at: http://osf.io/wfc6u.Google Scholar
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