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A more ecological perspective on human–robot interactions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 April 2023

Varun Ravikumar
Affiliation:
Rotman Institute of Philosophy, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7, Canada mande54@uwo.ca jbowen23@uwo.ca vraviku@uwo.ca http://www.emrglab.org/
Jonathan Bowen
Affiliation:
Rotman Institute of Philosophy, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7, Canada mande54@uwo.ca jbowen23@uwo.ca vraviku@uwo.ca http://www.emrglab.org/
Michael L. Anderson
Affiliation:
Rotman Institute of Philosophy, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7, Canada mande54@uwo.ca jbowen23@uwo.ca vraviku@uwo.ca http://www.emrglab.org/

Abstract

Drawing from two strands of ecological psychology, we suggest that even if social robots are interactive depictions, people need not mentally represent them as such. Rather, people can engage with the opportunities for action or affordances that social robots offer to them. These affordances are constrained by the larger sociocultural settings within which human–robot interactions occur.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2023. Published by Cambridge University Press

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