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Predictions in the light of your own action repertoire as a general computational principle

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 May 2013

Peter König
Affiliation:
Institute of Cognitive Science, University Osnabrück, 49076 Osnabrück, Germany. koenig@uni-osnabrueck.dehttp://cogsci.uni-osnabrueck.de/~NBP/nwilming@uni-osnabrueck.dehttp://cogsci.uni-osnabrueck.de/~nwilming/kkaspar@uni-osnabrueck.dehttp://kai-kaspar.jimdo.com/snagel@uni-osnabrueck.dehttp://cogsci.uni-osnabrueck.de/en/changingbrains/people/saskia Department of Neurophysiology and Pathophysiology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, 20251 Hamburg, Germany
Niklas Wilming
Affiliation:
Institute of Cognitive Science, University Osnabrück, 49076 Osnabrück, Germany. koenig@uni-osnabrueck.dehttp://cogsci.uni-osnabrueck.de/~NBP/nwilming@uni-osnabrueck.dehttp://cogsci.uni-osnabrueck.de/~nwilming/kkaspar@uni-osnabrueck.dehttp://kai-kaspar.jimdo.com/snagel@uni-osnabrueck.dehttp://cogsci.uni-osnabrueck.de/en/changingbrains/people/saskia
Kai Kaspar
Affiliation:
Institute of Cognitive Science, University Osnabrück, 49076 Osnabrück, Germany. koenig@uni-osnabrueck.dehttp://cogsci.uni-osnabrueck.de/~NBP/nwilming@uni-osnabrueck.dehttp://cogsci.uni-osnabrueck.de/~nwilming/kkaspar@uni-osnabrueck.dehttp://kai-kaspar.jimdo.com/snagel@uni-osnabrueck.dehttp://cogsci.uni-osnabrueck.de/en/changingbrains/people/saskia
Saskia K. Nagel
Affiliation:
Institute of Cognitive Science, University Osnabrück, 49076 Osnabrück, Germany. koenig@uni-osnabrueck.dehttp://cogsci.uni-osnabrueck.de/~NBP/nwilming@uni-osnabrueck.dehttp://cogsci.uni-osnabrueck.de/~nwilming/kkaspar@uni-osnabrueck.dehttp://kai-kaspar.jimdo.com/snagel@uni-osnabrueck.dehttp://cogsci.uni-osnabrueck.de/en/changingbrains/people/saskia
Selim Onat
Affiliation:
Department of Systems Neuroscience, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, 20251 Hamburg, Germany. sonat@uos.dewww.selimonat.com

Abstract

We argue that brains generate predictions only within the constraints of the action repertoire. This makes the computational complexity tractable and fosters a step-by-step parallel development of sensory and motor systems. Hence, it is more of a benefit than a literal constraint and may serve as a universal normative principle to understand sensorimotor coupling and interactions with the world.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2013 

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