Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-559fc8cf4f-lzpzj Total loading time: 0.658 Render date: 2021-03-07T18:53:06.905Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Pros and cons of blurring gesture-language lines: An evolutionary linguistic perspective

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 April 2017

Matthew L. Hall
Affiliation:
Department of Linguistics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269. matthall.research@gmail.com
Corresponding

Abstract

The target article's emphasis on distinguishing sign from gesture may resolve one important objection to gesture-first theories of language evolution. However, this approach risks undervaluing the gradual progression from nonlanguage to language over hominin evolution, and in emerging sign systems today. I call for less emphasis on drawing boundaries and more emphasis on understanding the processes of change.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2017 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Arbib, M. A. (2005) From monkey-like action recognition to human language: An evolutionary framework for neurolinguistics. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28(02):105–24.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Corballis, M. C. (2003) From hand to mouth: The origins of language. Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
de Condillac, E. B. (1798) Essai sur l'origine des conaissances humaines. Ch. Houel.Google Scholar
De Queiroz, K. (2007) Species concepts and species delimitation. Systematic Biology 56(6):879–86.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hewes, G. W. (1973) Primate communication and the gestural origin of language. Current Anthropology 12(1–2):524.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Irwin, D. E., Irwin, J. H. & Price, T. D. (2001) Ring species as bridges between microevolution and speciation. Genetica 112(1):223–43.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Jastrow, J. (1886) The evolution of language. Science 555–57.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
McNeill, D., Duncan, S. D., Cole, J., Gallagher, S. & Bertenthal, B. (2008) Growth points from the very beginning. Interaction Studies 9(1):117–32.Google Scholar
Sandler, W. (submitted) What comes first in language emergence? In: Dependencies in language: On the causal ontology of linguistic systems, ed. Nick, E.. Language Science Press, Studies in Diversity Linguistics Series.Google Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 51
Total number of PDF views: 84 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 26th April 2017 - 7th March 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Pros and cons of blurring gesture-language lines: An evolutionary linguistic perspective
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Pros and cons of blurring gesture-language lines: An evolutionary linguistic perspective
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Pros and cons of blurring gesture-language lines: An evolutionary linguistic perspective
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *