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The stimulus-response crisis

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 February 2022

Robyn Wilford
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, University of Western Ontario, London, ONN6A 3K7, Canadarwilfor@uwo.ca
Juan Ardila-Cifuentes
Affiliation:
Department of Philosophy, University of Western Ontario, London, ONN6A 3K7, Canadajardilac@uwo.ca
Edward Baggs
Affiliation:
The Rotman Institute of Philosophy, University of Western Ontario, London, ONN6A 3K7, Canadaebaggs@uwo.cawww.emrglab.org
Michael L. Anderson
Affiliation:
Department of Philosophy, University of Western Ontario, London, ONN6A 3K7, Canadajardilac@uwo.ca The Rotman Institute of Philosophy, University of Western Ontario, London, ONN6A 3K7, Canadaebaggs@uwo.cawww.emrglab.org The Brain and Mind Institute, The University of Western Ontario, London, ONN6A 3K7, Canada. mande54@uwo.ca

Abstract

Yarkoni correctly recognizes that one reason for psychology's generalizability crisis is the failure to account for variance within experiments. We argue that this problem, and the generalizability crisis broadly, is a necessary consequence of the stimulus-response paradigm widely used in psychology research. We point to another methodology, perturbation experiments, as a remedy that is not vulnerable to the same problems.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2022. Published by Cambridge University Press

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