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A theory limited in scope and evidence

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 August 2020

Elena Miu
Affiliation:
School of Human Evolution and Social Change and Institute of Human Origins, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ85287. emiu1@asu.edu Robert.Boyd.1@asu.edu thomas.j.h.morgan@asu.edu
Robert Boyd
Affiliation:
School of Human Evolution and Social Change and Institute of Human Origins, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ85287. emiu1@asu.edu Robert.Boyd.1@asu.edu thomas.j.h.morgan@asu.edu
Peter J. Richerson
Affiliation:
Department of Environmental Science and Policy, University of California Davis, CA95616. pjricherson@ucdavis.edu
Thomas J. H. Morgan
Affiliation:
School of Human Evolution and Social Change and Institute of Human Origins, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ85287. emiu1@asu.edu Robert.Boyd.1@asu.edu thomas.j.h.morgan@asu.edu

Abstract

What promised to be a refreshing addition to cumulative cultural evolution, by moving the focus from cultural transmission to technological innovation, falls flat through a lack of thoroughness, explanatory power, and data. A comprehensive theory of cumulative cultural change must carefully integrate all existing evidence in a cohesive multi-level account. We argue that the manuscript fails to do so convincingly.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press

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