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There is no psychology without inferential statistics

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 February 2022

Shilaan Alzahawi
Affiliation:
Graduate School of Business, Stanford University, Knight Management Center, Stanford, CA94305, USAshilaan@stanford.edu; https://shilaan.rbind.iomonin@stanford.edu; https://monin.people.stanford.edu
Benoît Monin
Affiliation:
Graduate School of Business, Stanford University, Knight Management Center, Stanford, CA94305, USAshilaan@stanford.edu; https://shilaan.rbind.iomonin@stanford.edu; https://monin.people.stanford.edu

Abstract

Quantification has been constitutive of psychology since its inception and is core to its scientific status. The adoption of qualitative methods eschewing inferential statistics is therefore unlikely to obtain. Rather than discarding useful tools because of improper use, we recommend highlighting how inferential statistics can be more thoughtfully applied.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2022. Published by Cambridge University Press

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