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Toward true integration

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 April 2017

Joana Rosselló
Affiliation:
Department of Catalan Philology and General Linguistics, Universitat de Barcelona, 08007 Barcelona, Spain. joana.rossello@ub.edu
Otávio Mattos
Affiliation:
Cognitive Development Center, Central European University, 1051 Budapest, Hungary. mattos_otavio@phd.ceu.edu
Wolfram Hinzen
Affiliation:
ICREA (Catalan Institute for Advanced Studies and Research), 08010 Barcelona, Spain. Department of Translation and Language Sciences, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, 08018 Barcelona, Spain. wolfram.hinzen@upf.edu https://sites.google.com/site/wolframhinzen/ FIDMAG Germanes Hospitalaries Research Foundation, 08830 Sant Boi de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain. Philosophy Department, Durham University, Durham, DH1 3HN, England, United Kingdom.

Abstract

Whether in sign or speech, language is more integrative than the target article suggests. A more integrative view embraces not only sign/speech and co-sign/speech gesture, but also indicative gestures irrespective of modality, and locations along with movements in the signed modality, as suggested by both linguistic acquisition and pathologies. An extended integrative view also proves advantageous in terms of conceptual coherence.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2017 

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