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Two faces of social-psychological realism

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 March 2017

Nicholas Hoover Wilson
Affiliation:
Department of Sociology, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-4356. nicholas.wilson@stonybrook.eduhttp://www.stonybrook.edu/commcms/sociology/people/faculty/wilson.html
Julie Y. Huang
Affiliation:
College of Business, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3775. Julie.huang@stonybrook.eduhttp://www.stonybrook.edu/commcms/business/faculty_pages/fulltime/Julie%20Huang.html

Abstract

This commentary places Jussim (2012) in dialogue with sociological perspectives on social reality and the political-academic nature of scientific paradigms. Specifically, we highlight how institutions, observers, and what is being observed intersect, and discuss the implications of this intersection on measurement within the social world. We then identify similarities between Jussim's specific narrative regarding social perception research, with noted patterns of scientific change.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2017 

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