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Why we forget our dreams: Acetylcholine and norepinephrine in wakefulness and REM sleep

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 January 2017

Andrea Becchetti
Affiliation:
Department of Biotechnology and Biosciences and Center for Neuroscience of Milan, University of Milano—Bicocca, 20128 Milan, Italyandrea.becchetti@unimib.ithttp://www.btbs.unimib.it
Alida Amadeo
Affiliation:
Department of Biosciences, University of Milano, 20133 Milan, Italyalida.amadeo@unimi.ithttp://www.dbs.unimi.it

Abstract

The ascending fibers releasing norepinephrine and acetylcholine are highly active during wakefulness. In contrast, during rapid-eye-movement sleep, the neocortical tone is sustained mainly by acetylcholine. By comparing the different physiological features of the norepinephrine and acetylcholine systems in the light of the GANE (glutamate amplifies noradrenergic effects) model, we suggest how to interpret some functional differences between waking and rapid-eye-movement sleep.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2016 

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