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Cooperation in human teaching

  • Ann Cale Kruger (a1)

Abstract

Kline's evolutionary analysis of teaching provides welcome reframing for cross-species comparisons. However, theory based on competition cannot explain the transmission of human cultural elements that were collectively created. Humans evolved in a cultural niche and teaching-learning coevolved to transmit culture. To study human cultural variation in teaching, we need a more articulated theory of this distinctively human engagement.

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References

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Gallese, V. (2001) The “Shared Manifold” hypothesis: From mirror neurons to empathy. Journal of Consciousness Studies 8:3350.
Kruger, A. C. (2011) Imitation, communion and culture. In: Mimesis and science: Empirical research on imitation and the mimetic theory of culture and religion, ed. Garrels, S. R., pp. 111–28. Michigan State University Press.
Kruger, A. C. & Tomasello, M. (1996) Cultural learning and learning culture. In: Handbook of education and human development: New models of learning, teaching, and schooling, ed. Olson, D. R. & Torrance, N., pp. 369–87. Blackwell.
Tomasello, M. (2014) A natural history of human thinking. Harvard University Press.
Tomasello, M., Kruger, A. C. & Ratner, H. H. (1993) Cultural learning. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16:495552.
Vygotsky, L. S. (1978) Mind in society: The development of higher psychological processes. Harvard University Press.
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Behavioral and Brain Sciences
  • ISSN: 0140-525X
  • EISSN: 1469-1825
  • URL: /core/journals/behavioral-and-brain-sciences
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