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Enhancing research credibility when replication is not feasible

  • Robert J. MacCoun (a1)

Abstract

Direct replications are not always affordable or feasible, and for some phenomena they are impossible. In such situations, methods of blinded data analysis can help minimize p-hacking and confirmation bias, increasing our confidence in a study's results.

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References

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