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Good things come in threes: Communicative acts comprise linguistic, imagistic, and modifying components

  • Lena Kästner (a1) and Albert Newen (a2)

Abstract

Gesture and sign form an integrated communication system, as do gesture and speech. Communicative acts in both systems combine categorical linguistic (words or signs) with imagistic (gestures) components. Additionally, both sign and speech can employ modifying components that convey iconic information tied to a linguistic base morpheme. An accurate analysis of communicative acts must take this third category into account.

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Duncan, S. (2005) Gesture in signing: A case study from Taiwan sign language. Language and Linguistics 6(2):279318.
Okrent, A. (2002) A modality-free notion of gesture and how it can help us with the morpheme vs. gesture question in sign language linguistics, or at least give us some criteria to work with. In: Modality and structure in signed and spoken languages, ed. Meier, R. P., Quinto-Pozos, D. G. & Cormier, K. A., pp. 175–98. Cambridge University Press.
Sandler, W. (2009) Symbiotic symbolization by hand and mouth in sign language. Semiotica 174:241–75.

Good things come in threes: Communicative acts comprise linguistic, imagistic, and modifying components

  • Lena Kästner (a1) and Albert Newen (a2)

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