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    Gregori, Dario Ballali, Simonetta Vecchio, Maria Gabriella Sciré, Antonella Silvia Foltran, Francesca and Berchialla, Paola 2014. Randomized Controlled Trials Evaluating Effect of Television Advertising on Food Intake in Children: Why Such a Sensitive Topic is Lacking Top-Level Evidence?. Ecology of Food and Nutrition, Vol. 53, Issue. 5, p. 562.


    Pitts, A. Burke, W. and Adams, J. 2014. Marketing messages in food and alcohol magazine advertisements, variations across type and nutritional content of promoted products: a content analysis. Journal of Public Health, Vol. 36, Issue. 3, p. 417.


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Socio-economic differences in exposure to television food advertisements in the UK: a cross-sectional study of advertisements broadcast in one television region

  • Jean Adams (a1), Rachel Tyrrell (a1) (a2), Ashley J Adamson (a1) (a2) and Martin White (a1)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1368980011001686
  • Published online: 02 August 2011
Abstract
AbstractObjective

To document socio-economic differences in exposure to food advertising, including advertisements for foods high in fat, salt and sugar (HFSS) as defined by the UK Food Standards Agency's Nutrient Profiling Model.

Design

A cross-sectional survey. Information (including product advertised and viewing figures) on all advertisements broadcast in one UK region over one week (6–12 July 2009) was obtained. Food advertisements were identified and linked to nutritional information on the content of advertised foods.

Setting

UK Tyne-Tees television region.

Subjects

Data were sourced from a UK-wide television viewing panel.

Results

Eleven per cent of advertising seen was for food and 63 % of food advertising seen was for HFSS foods. The proportion of all advertising seen that was for food was smaller among viewers in the least v. most affluent social grade (OR = 0·98, 99 % CI 0·95, 1·00). There was no difference in the proportion of food advertising seen that was for HFSS food between viewers in the most and least affluent social grades. Total exposure to both all food advertising and HFSS food advertising was 2·1 times greater among the least v. the most affluent viewers.

Conclusions

While the least affluent viewers saw relatively fewer food advertisements, their absolute exposure to all food and HFSS food advertisements was higher than that of the most affluent viewers. Current UK restrictions prohibit advertisements for HFSS foods during programmes with a high proportion of child viewers. Extending these to all programming may reduce socio-economic inequalities in exposure to these advertisements and in diet and obesity.

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Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Email j.m.adams@ncl.ac.uk
Linked references
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