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Language as a mental travel guide

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 June 2020

Charles P. Davis
Affiliation:
Department of Psychological Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT06269charles.davis@uconn.edu gerry.altmann@uconn.edu eiling.yee@uconn.edu http://charlespdavis.com http://altmann.lab.uconn.edu http://yeelab.uconn.edu Connecticut Institute for the Brain and Cognitive Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT06269
Gerry T. M. Altmann
Affiliation:
Department of Psychological Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT06269charles.davis@uconn.edu gerry.altmann@uconn.edu eiling.yee@uconn.edu http://charlespdavis.com http://altmann.lab.uconn.edu http://yeelab.uconn.edu Connecticut Institute for the Brain and Cognitive Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT06269
Eiling Yee
Affiliation:
Department of Psychological Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT06269charles.davis@uconn.edu gerry.altmann@uconn.edu eiling.yee@uconn.edu http://charlespdavis.com http://altmann.lab.uconn.edu http://yeelab.uconn.edu Connecticut Institute for the Brain and Cognitive Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT06269

Abstract

Gilead et al.'s approach to human cognition places abstraction and prediction at the heart of “mental travel” under a “representational diversity” perspective that embraces foundational concepts in cognitive science. But, it gives insufficient credit to the possibility that the process of abstraction produces a gradient, and underestimates the importance of a highly influential domain in predictive cognition: language, and related, the emergence of experientially based structure through time.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press

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