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Scale-free architectures support representational diversity

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 June 2020

Chris Fields
Affiliation:
Independent, 11106Caunes-Minervois, France. fieldsres@gmail.com https://chrisfieldsresearch.com
James F. Glazebrook
Affiliation:
Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Eastern Illinois University, Charleston, IL61920jfglazebrook@eiu.edu https://faculty.math.illinois.edu/~glazebro/

Abstract

Gilead et al. propose an ontology of abstract representations based on folk-psychological conceptions of cognitive architecture. There is, however, no evidence that the experience of cognition reveals the architecture of cognition. Scale-free architectural models propose that cognition has the same computational architecture from sub-cellular to whole-organism scales. This scale-free architecture supports representations with diverse functions and levels of abstraction.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press

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