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  • ISSN: 0968-5650 (Print), 1474-0052 (Online)
  • Editors: Stefano Battilossi Universidad Carlos III Madrid, Spain and Rui Pedro Esteves The Graduate Institute, Geneva, Switzerland
  • Editorial board
Published for The European Association for Banking and Financial History. Established in 1994, Financial History Review has earned a solid international reputation as an academic journal committed to research of high scholarly standards. The Review deliberately seeks to embrace a broad approach to financial, banking and monetary history, which appeals to a wide audience of historians, economists and practitioners. We welcome different perspectives including analytical narratives, theoretically-inspired research, advanced empirical analysis, and the interrelations between history, finance, policy, culture and society. FHR publishes research articles dealing with any historical period and country or regional area. The Review, through its section "The Past Mirror", is also an assiduous advocate of the relevance of history for a proper understanding of present financial and monetary developments.

Latest articles




History blog

  • Why Revisit the Early Modern Canon?
  • 16 August 2018, Lisa Shapiro
  • The thing about canons is that they seem sacred. Challenging them, even revisiting them, can seem heretical. Facing these facts is the first step in addressing...
  • The Tudor banquet: digital text mining reveals new information
  • 14 August 2018, Louise Stewart
  • This blog accomapnies Louise Stewart’s Historical Journal article ‘Social Status and Classicism in the Visual and Material Culture of the Sweet Today, the term ‘banquet’ is commonly used to refer to any lavish feast.  However, in the Tudor and Stuart period the word had a different, and very specific meaning, referring to a separate meal which consisted solely of sweet foods.  In September 1591, for example, Queen Elizabeth I visited the Earl of Hertford at his estate at Elvetham.  The lavish entertainments provided for the queen during her four day stay included water pageants, fireworks, feasts and a glittering ‘banquet’.  A printed account of the entertainment makes it clear that this banquet was no ordinary meal.  It was served in the garden after supper, ‘all in glass and silver’ and accompanied by a spectacular fireworks display.  The queen was presented with a thousand sweet dishes including sculptural sugar work representing her arms, castles and forts, human figures and mythical and exotic animals as well as preserved fruits and other confections.  This elaborate spectacle was typical of the sweet banquet.…...