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Affective Social Learning serves as a quick and flexible complement to TTOM

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 May 2020

Fabrice Clément
Affiliation:
Cognitive Science Centre, University of Neuchâtel, Neuchâtel, Switzerlandfabrice.clement@unine.ch https://www.unine.ch/islc/home/collaborateurs/professeurs/fabrice-clement.html
Daniel Dukes
Affiliation:
University of Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland Swiss Center for Affective Sciences, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland. daniel.dukes@unige.ch https://dukes.space/

Abstract

Although we applaud the general aims of the target article, we argue that Affective Social Learning completes TTOM by pointing out how emotions can provide another route to acquiring culture, a route which may be quicker, more flexible, and even closer to an axiological definition of culture (less about what is, and more about what should be) than TTOM itself.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press

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References

Charafeddine, R., Mercier, H., Clément, F., Kaufmann, L., Berchtold, A., Reboul, A. & Van der Henst, J.-B. (2015) How preschoolers use cues of dominance to make sense of their social environment. Journal of Cognition and Development 16(4):587607.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chudek, M., Heller, S., Birch, S. & Henrich, J. (2012) Prestige-biased cultural learning: Bystander's differential attention to potential models influences children's learning. Evolution and Human Behavior 33(1):4656.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Clément, F. & Dukes, D. (2017) Social appraisal and social referencing: Two components of affective social learning. Emotion Review 9(3):253–61.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Clément, F. & Dukes, D. (in press) Affective social learning: A lens for developing a fuller picture of socialization processes. In The Oxford handbook of emotional development, eds. Dukes, D., Samson, A. & Walle, E.. Oxford University Press. Forthcoming in 2021.Google Scholar
Dukes, D. & Clément, F. eds. (2019) Foundations of affective social learning: Conceptualising the social transmission of value. Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kaufmann, L. & Clément, F. (2014) Wired for society: Cognizing pathways to society and culture. Topoi. An International Review of Philosophy 33(2):459–75.Google Scholar
Sorce, J., Emde, R., Campos, J. & Klinnert, M. (1985) Maternal emotional signaling: Its effect on the visual cliff behavior of 1-year-olds. Developmental Psychology 21:195200.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

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Affective Social Learning serves as a quick and flexible complement to TTOM
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