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The artistic design stance and the interpretation of Paleolithic art

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 March 2013

Johan De Smedt
Affiliation:
Department of Philosophy and Ethics, Ghent University, 9000 Gent, Belgium. johan.desmedt@ugent.behttp://ugent.academia.edu/JohanDeSmedt
Helen De Cruz
Affiliation:
Institute of Philosophy, University of Leuven and Somerville College, University of Oxford, 3000 Leuven, Belgium. helen.decruz@hiw.kuleuven.behttp://www.some.ox.ac.uk/206-4361/all/1/Dr_Helen__De_Cruz_.aspx

Abstract

The artistic design stance is an important part of art appreciation, but it remains unclear how it can be applied to artworks for which art historical context is no longer available, such as Ice Age art. We propose that some of the designer's intentions can be gathered noninferentially through direct experience with prehistoric artworks.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2013 

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