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The multicultural mind as an epistemological test and extension for the thinking through other minds approach

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 May 2020

George I. Christopoulos
Affiliation:
Culture Science Innovations, Nanyang Business School, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798, Singapore. cgeorgios@ntu.edu.sg www.deonlabblog.com
Ying-yi Hong
Affiliation:
Department of Marketing, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong. yyhong@cuhk.edu.hk http://www.yingyihong.org/hong-ying-yi.html

Abstract

The multicultural experience (i.e., multicultural individuals and cross-cultural experiences) offers the intriguing possibility for (i) an empirical examination of how free-energy principles explain dynamic cultural behaviors and pragmatic cultural phenomena and (ii) a challenging but decisive test of thinking through other minds (TTOM) predictions. We highlight that TTOM needs to treat individuals as active cultural agents instead of passive learners.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press

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