Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-59b7f5684b-frvt8 Total loading time: 0.929 Render date: 2022-10-04T01:42:39.618Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": true, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

Normativity, social change, and the epistemological framing of culture

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 May 2020

Andrew Buskell*
Affiliation:
Department of History and Philosophy of Science, University of Cambridge, CambridgeCB2 3RH, UK. ab2086@cam.ac.uk

Abstract

The authors deploy an epistemic framework to represent culture and model the acquisition of cultural behavior. Yet, the framing inherits familiar problems with explaining the acquisition of norms. Such problems are conspicuous with regard to human societies where norms are ubiquitous. This creates a new difficulty for the authors in explaining change to mutually exclusive organizational structures of human life.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Birch, J. (m.s.) Toolmaking and the origin of normative cognition.Google Scholar
Chemero, A. (2009) Radical embodied cognitive science. MIT Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Laitin, D. (2007) Nations, states, and violence. Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mace, R. & Jordan, F.M. (2011) Macro-evolutionary studies of cultural diversity: A review of empirical studies of cultural transmission and cultural adaptation. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences 366:402411.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Rietveld, E. & Kiverstein, J. (2014) A rich landscape of affordances. Ecological Psychology 26(4):325–52. https://doi.org/10.1080/10407413.2014.958035.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Salali, G. D., Chaudhary, N., Bouer, J., Thompson, J., Vinicius, L. & Migliano, A. B. (2019) Development of social learning and play in BaYaka hunter-gatherers of Congo. Scientific Reports 9:11080.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Walsh, D. (2015) Organisms, agency, and evolution. Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wengrow, D. & Graeber, D. (2015) Farewell to the “childhood of man”: Ritual, seasonality, and the origins of inequality. Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute 21:597619.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Normativity, social change, and the epistemological framing of culture
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Normativity, social change, and the epistemological framing of culture
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Normativity, social change, and the epistemological framing of culture
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *