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Heroes of our own story: Self-image and rationalizing in thought experiments

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 April 2020

Tomer David Ullman*
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, 02138. tullman@fas.harvard.eduwww.tomerullman.org

Abstract

Cushman's rationalization account can be extended to cover another part of his portrayal of representational exchange: thought experiments that lead to conclusions about the self. While Cushman's argument is compelling, a full account of rationalization as adaptive will need to account for the divergence in rationalizing one's actions compared to the actions of others.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press

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