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Obligations without cooperation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 April 2020

Julia Marshall*
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Yale University, New Haven, CT06511. julia.marshall@yale.edujuliaannemarshall.com

Abstract

Our sense of obligation is evident outside of joint collaborative activities. Most notably, children and adults recognize that parents are obligated to care for and love their children. This is presumably not because we think parents view their children as worthy cooperative partners, but because special obligations and duties are inherent in certain relational dynamics, namely the parent-child relationship.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press

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