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Acknowledging and managing deep constraints on moral agency and the self

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 March 2018

Laura Niemi
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138. lauraniemi@fas.harvard.edu
Jesse Graham
Affiliation:
Department of Management, David Eccles School of Business, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112. jesse.graham@eccles.utah.edu

Abstract

Doris proposes that the exercise of morally responsible agency unfolds as a collaborative dialogue among selves expressing their values while being subject to ever-present constraints. We assess the fit of Doris's account with recent data from psychology and neuroscience related to how people make judgments about moral agency (responsibility, blame), and how they understand the self after traumatic events.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2018 

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