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The evolution of music as artistic cultural innovation expressing intuitive thought symbolically

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 September 2021

Valerie van Mulukom*
Affiliation:
Centre for Trust, Peace and Social Relations, Coventry University, Innovation Village IV5, CoventryCV1 2TL, UK. valerie.vanmulukom@coventry.ac.uk; https://valerievanmulukom.com/

Abstract

Music is an artistic cultural innovation, and therefore it may be considered as intuitive thought expressed in symbols, which can efficiently convey multiple meanings in learning, thinking, and transmission, selected for and passed on through cultural evolution. The symbolic system has personal adaptive benefits besides social ones, which should not be overlooked even if music may tend more to the latter.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press

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