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How cognition affects perception: Brain activity modelling to unravel top-down dynamics

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 January 2017

Martin Desseilles
Affiliation:
Cyclotron Research Centre, University of Liège B30, B-4000 Liège, Belgium c.phillips@ulg.ac.be http://www.cyclotron.ulg.ac.be/cms/c_15006/fr/christophe-phillips Clinique Psychiatrique des Frères Alexiens, B-4841 Henri-Chapelle, Belgium http://mentalhealthsciences.com/index_en.html Department of Psychology, University of Namur, B-5000 Namur, Belgium. martin.desseilles@unamur.be
Christophe Phillips
Affiliation:
Cyclotron Research Centre, University of Liège B30, B-4000 Liège, Belgium c.phillips@ulg.ac.be http://www.cyclotron.ulg.ac.be/cms/c_15006/fr/christophe-phillips

Abstract

In this commentary on Firestone & Scholl's (F&S's) article, we argue that researchers should use brain-activity modelling to investigate top-down mechanisms. Using functional brain imaging and a specific cognitive paradigm, modelling the BOLD signal provided new insight into the dynamic causalities involved in the influence of cognitions on perceptions.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2016 

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References

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