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The Haskell School of Expression
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Book description

Functional programming is a style of programming that emphasizes the use of functions (in contrast to object-oriented programming, which emphasizes the use of objects). It has become popular in recent years because of its simplicity, conciseness, and clarity. This book teaches functional programming as a way of thinking and problem solving, using Haskell, the most popular purely functional language. Rather than using the conventional (boring) mathematical examples commonly found in other programming language textbooks, the author uses examples drawn from multimedia applications, including graphics, animation, and computer music, thus rewarding the reader with working programs for inherently more interesting applications. Aimed at both beginning and advanced programmers, this tutorial begins with a gentle introduction to functional programming and moves rapidly on to more advanced topics. Details about progamming in Haskell are presented in boxes throughout the text so they can be easily found and referred to.

Reviews

‘… a rather unusual and very interesting book for the functional programming community. The author’s style is wonderful, and he is good at explaining the material … unique in the field of functional programming’.

M. Ivanovi´c Source: Artificial Intelligence

‘… a novel and intuitively appealing approach to teaching functional programming … could profitably be used for an advanced undergraduate course focusing on domain-specific languages in this area.’

Source: Journal of Functional Programming

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Contents


Page 1 of 2


  • Frontmatter
    pp i-iv
  • Dedication
    pp v-vi
  • Contents
    pp vii-xii
  • Preface
    pp xiii-xviii
  • 1 - Problem Solving, Programming, and Calculation
    pp 1-20
  • 2 - A Module of Shapes: Part I
    pp 21-34
  • 3 - Simple Graphics
    pp 35-47
  • 4 - Shapes II: Drawing Shapes
    pp 48-55
  • 5 - Polymorphic and Higher-Order Functions
    pp 56-73
  • 6 - Shapes III: Perimeters of Shapes
    pp 74-80
  • 7 - Trees
    pp 81-86
  • 8 - A Module of Regions
    pp 87-104
  • 9 - More About Higher-Order Functions
    pp 105-113
  • 10 - Drawing Regions
    pp 114-130
  • 11 - Proof by Induction
    pp 131-146
  • 12 - Qualified Types
    pp 147-162
  • 13 - A Module of Simple Animations
    pp 163-186
  • 14 - Programming With Streams
    pp 187-207
  • 15 - A Module of Reactive Animations
    pp 208-235
  • 16 - Communicating With the Outside World
    pp 236-244
  • 17 - Rendering Reactive Animations
    pp 245-248
  • 18 - Higher-Order Types
    pp 249-264
  • 19 - An Imperative Robot Language
    pp 265-286
  • 20 - Functional Music Composition
    pp 287-303
  • 21 - Interpreting Functional Music
    pp 304-312
  • 22 - Interpreting Functional Music
    pp 313-320
  • 23 - A Tour of the Preludelist Module
    pp 321-331
  • 24 - A Tour of Haskell's Standard Type Classes
    pp 332-344
  • A - Built-in Types Are Not Special
    pp 345-347
  • B - Pattern-Matching Details
    pp 348-352

Page 1 of 2


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